turnabout:

theweekmagazine:

The complete guide to cooking eggs every which way
You’ve had scrambled eggs. You’ve had poached eggs. But have you had poached-scrambled eggs?

Egg-cellent cookery.
turnabout:

theweekmagazine:

The complete guide to cooking eggs every which way
You’ve had scrambled eggs. You’ve had poached eggs. But have you had poached-scrambled eggs?

Egg-cellent cookery.
turnabout:

theweekmagazine:

The complete guide to cooking eggs every which way
You’ve had scrambled eggs. You’ve had poached eggs. But have you had poached-scrambled eggs?

Egg-cellent cookery.

turnabout:

theweekmagazine:

The complete guide to cooking eggs every which way

You’ve had scrambled eggs. You’ve had poached eggs. But have you had poached-scrambled eggs?

Egg-cellent cookery.

bookavore:

This is my Internet Chicken. I wanted to roast a chicken but was overwhelmed by the number of ways the Internet recommended to do so, so I asked Facebook, at which point I was overwhelmed by the number of ways Facebook thought I could roast a chicken. To cope, I roasted this chicken by combining several recommendations:

  • I started with Thomas Keller’s Simple Roast Chicken recipe because it got the most mentions, and because I can’t resist any recipe that includes instructions to “rain the salt” over something;
  • I followed Martha Stewart’s recommendation to pierce a lemon with a fork repeatedly and put it in the cavity;
  • I followed a friend’s idea to line the roasting pan with potato rounds, carrots, and a rough cut onion;
  • I took another friend’s advice to trust the thermometer rather than the timer;
  • I added a bunch of garlic cloves to everything because it seemed like a lot of people mentioned garlic.

It was, of course, fantastic, because apparently there is no wrong way to roast a chicken. The Internet! Is there anything it can’t do? Internet Chicken.

nbcnightlynews:

How do you celebrate Pi Day? With pie, of course!

(via npr)

lacuisine:

What’s the point of bay leaves?
Lots of stews, stocks, and soups call for bay leaves, but I don’t really taste them in the final dish. Would it make a difference if I left them out?

Here’s an easy way to see what bay leaves really taste like: throw a couple in a pot of water and let it simmer. Taste it after five minutes and you’ll probably get a good hit of menthol and eucalyptus (think: Vick’s VapoRub). That’s the chemical eugenol you’re smelling, and it’s the biggest constituent in the bay leaf’s flavor arsenal of more than 50 compounds.
Let them simmer for longer as they would in a stew—say, an hour or so—and you’ll notice that the flavor and aroma will change. The harsh nose-clearing menthol will taper down, while more complex tea-like aromas will start to come forward. Those are the flavors you’re looking to add to your soups, stews, and sauces.
It’s understandable why you may think they’re optional. Bay leaf, by its very nature, plays second fiddle to other, more prominent flavors. But just as a grind of black pepper, some sautéed anchovies, or a softened leek might not be instantly recognizable in a stew, they add a layer of subtle background music for the stars of your dish to play over.

lacuisine:

What’s the point of bay leaves?

Lots of stews, stocks, and soups call for bay leaves, but I don’t really taste them in the final dish. Would it make a difference if I left them out?

Here’s an easy way to see what bay leaves really taste like: throw a couple in a pot of water and let it simmer. Taste it after five minutes and you’ll probably get a good hit of menthol and eucalyptus (think: Vick’s VapoRub). That’s the chemical eugenol you’re smelling, and it’s the biggest constituent in the bay leaf’s flavor arsenal of more than 50 compounds.

Let them simmer for longer as they would in a stew—say, an hour or so—and you’ll notice that the flavor and aroma will change. The harsh nose-clearing menthol will taper down, while more complex tea-like aromas will start to come forward. Those are the flavors you’re looking to add to your soups, stews, and sauces.

It’s understandable why you may think they’re optional. Bay leaf, by its very nature, plays second fiddle to other, more prominent flavors. But just as a grind of black pepper, some sautéed anchovies, or a softened leek might not be instantly recognizable in a stew, they add a layer of subtle background music for the stars of your dish to play over.

thingsorganizedneatly:

John Dominis, 1968

ed: T.O.N. got a little mention on NPR’s The Picture Show.

tag your porn!

jaimealyse:

buzzfeedfood:

You may have noticed that there are about a million roast chicken recipes floating around the internet, all claiming the be THE BEST EVER. Obviously, only one can actually be the best. We decided to find out which one.

The trick is to make a hybrid recipe: Roast on a bed of veggies a la Jamie Oliver, stuff herbs (and butter, please) under the skin a la Judy Rodgers - the herbs and butter keep the meat perfect and delicious, and the bed of veggies stops the bottom from burning or smoking, and is your side dish. One-pan meal, perfect roast chicken.

Figuring out your personal preference in roasting chickens is one of the biggest culinary favors you can do for yourself.  jaimealyse:

buzzfeedfood:

You may have noticed that there are about a million roast chicken recipes floating around the internet, all claiming the be THE BEST EVER. Obviously, only one can actually be the best. We decided to find out which one.

The trick is to make a hybrid recipe: Roast on a bed of veggies a la Jamie Oliver, stuff herbs (and butter, please) under the skin a la Judy Rodgers - the herbs and butter keep the meat perfect and delicious, and the bed of veggies stops the bottom from burning or smoking, and is your side dish. One-pan meal, perfect roast chicken.

Figuring out your personal preference in roasting chickens is one of the biggest culinary favors you can do for yourself.  jaimealyse:

buzzfeedfood:

You may have noticed that there are about a million roast chicken recipes floating around the internet, all claiming the be THE BEST EVER. Obviously, only one can actually be the best. We decided to find out which one.

The trick is to make a hybrid recipe: Roast on a bed of veggies a la Jamie Oliver, stuff herbs (and butter, please) under the skin a la Judy Rodgers - the herbs and butter keep the meat perfect and delicious, and the bed of veggies stops the bottom from burning or smoking, and is your side dish. One-pan meal, perfect roast chicken.

Figuring out your personal preference in roasting chickens is one of the biggest culinary favors you can do for yourself. 

jaimealyse:

buzzfeedfood:

You may have noticed that there are about a million roast chicken recipes floating around the internet, all claiming the be THE BEST EVER. Obviously, only one can actually be the best. We decided to find out which one.

The trick is to make a hybrid recipe: Roast on a bed of veggies a la Jamie Oliver, stuff herbs (and butter, please) under the skin a la Judy Rodgers - the herbs and butter keep the meat perfect and delicious, and the bed of veggies stops the bottom from burning or smoking, and is your side dish. One-pan meal, perfect roast chicken.

Figuring out your personal preference in roasting chickens is one of the biggest culinary favors you can do for yourself. 

(via jaimealyse)

seanrrwilkins:

randwiches:


Food Porn: Giant Fucking Steak

Hngggghgghhhhh

Can get it.
seanrrwilkins:

randwiches:


Food Porn: Giant Fucking Steak

Hngggghgghhhhh

Can get it.

seanrrwilkins:

randwiches:

Food Porn: Giant Fucking Steak

Hngggghgghhhhh

Can get it.

drawnbutter:

Madhur Jaffrey’s Lentils with Ginger
Madhur Jaffrey’s cookbook “At Home with Madhur Jaffrey” is a wonderful introduction to Indian cooking. Everything is simple and tasty and a joy to cook.
I’ve modified this recipe a bit. First, I say use less oil than she recommends. I tend to use 1/3 of the oil she calls for in all of her recipes. The one time I tried using the full amount of all she said, I ended up with a dish that was too oily for my tastes (and for my stomach to handle). Second, I tend to use more onion here than she asks for. I like having extra onion. And finally, the original recipe calls for red lentils. But I have made this recipe with red, brown, and green and they have all been delicious. So just use whatever lentils you have!
This is one of my favorite recipes for a gentle lunch or dinner. The preparation is easy and it’s quite tasty and filling. Plus, lentils are a good source of fiber! And iron? I think?
For the rice, I usually add in a cinnamon stick and some cardamom pods while it’s cooking, for added flavor. It goes nicely with the lentils.

Love the glove hands.  drawnbutter:

Madhur Jaffrey’s Lentils with Ginger
Madhur Jaffrey’s cookbook “At Home with Madhur Jaffrey” is a wonderful introduction to Indian cooking. Everything is simple and tasty and a joy to cook.
I’ve modified this recipe a bit. First, I say use less oil than she recommends. I tend to use 1/3 of the oil she calls for in all of her recipes. The one time I tried using the full amount of all she said, I ended up with a dish that was too oily for my tastes (and for my stomach to handle). Second, I tend to use more onion here than she asks for. I like having extra onion. And finally, the original recipe calls for red lentils. But I have made this recipe with red, brown, and green and they have all been delicious. So just use whatever lentils you have!
This is one of my favorite recipes for a gentle lunch or dinner. The preparation is easy and it’s quite tasty and filling. Plus, lentils are a good source of fiber! And iron? I think?
For the rice, I usually add in a cinnamon stick and some cardamom pods while it’s cooking, for added flavor. It goes nicely with the lentils.

Love the glove hands.  drawnbutter:

Madhur Jaffrey’s Lentils with Ginger
Madhur Jaffrey’s cookbook “At Home with Madhur Jaffrey” is a wonderful introduction to Indian cooking. Everything is simple and tasty and a joy to cook.
I’ve modified this recipe a bit. First, I say use less oil than she recommends. I tend to use 1/3 of the oil she calls for in all of her recipes. The one time I tried using the full amount of all she said, I ended up with a dish that was too oily for my tastes (and for my stomach to handle). Second, I tend to use more onion here than she asks for. I like having extra onion. And finally, the original recipe calls for red lentils. But I have made this recipe with red, brown, and green and they have all been delicious. So just use whatever lentils you have!
This is one of my favorite recipes for a gentle lunch or dinner. The preparation is easy and it’s quite tasty and filling. Plus, lentils are a good source of fiber! And iron? I think?
For the rice, I usually add in a cinnamon stick and some cardamom pods while it’s cooking, for added flavor. It goes nicely with the lentils.

Love the glove hands. 

drawnbutter:

Madhur Jaffrey’s Lentils with Ginger


Madhur Jaffrey’s cookbook “At Home with Madhur Jaffrey” is a wonderful introduction to Indian cooking. Everything is simple and tasty and a joy to cook.

I’ve modified this recipe a bit. First, I say use less oil than she recommends. I tend to use 1/3 of the oil she calls for in all of her recipes. The one time I tried using the full amount of all she said, I ended up with a dish that was too oily for my tastes (and for my stomach to handle). Second, I tend to use more onion here than she asks for. I like having extra onion. And finally, the original recipe calls for red lentils. But I have made this recipe with red, brown, and green and they have all been delicious. So just use whatever lentils you have!

This is one of my favorite recipes for a gentle lunch or dinner. The preparation is easy and it’s quite tasty and filling. Plus, lentils are a good source of fiber! And iron? I think?

For the rice, I usually add in a cinnamon stick and some cardamom pods while it’s cooking, for added flavor. It goes nicely with the lentils.

Love the glove hands. 

ffffffound:

Colossal | An art and design blog.

seanrrwilkins:

food52:

Three ways to get your perfect scrambled eggs — whatever your version of perfection may be.

Read more: How to Make Perfect Scrambled Eggs on Food52.

A fan of the “Low and Slow” method for lazy weekend mornings. They’re the base for Dirty Eggs for me to mix in onions, bacon grease, lots of cheese and a dollop of sour cream to finish them.

Is that the scrambled egg version of poutine?

Leftovers

This isn’t a late Thanksgiving post. (This isn’t early either; I’m Canadian.) Whether you choose to celebrate on Sunday (as we did) or Monday (officially), me writing this on Tuesday may look like coming late to the turkey party. But I’m not. Not when the best part of Thanksgiving is the leftovers.

Start with pie for breakfast. I made enough pastry on Saturday for three: apple/blackberry, pecan, and the roasted vegetable galette we make for my brother’s vegetarian girlfriend. I suppose I could have eaten the latter with, maybe, a nice fried egg on top and called it brunch. But apples are fruit, and everyone knows fruit is good for breakfast.

Lunch is easy. Lunch is turkey sandwiches. Leftover dinner buns, leftover turkey, leftover cheese from the afternoon cheese plate. This isn’t the time for lettuce.

All night, the slow cooker was making stock. All day, a pot on the stove was making soup. The sweet potatoes break down to thicken the broth, and we added the peas we forgot to cook for the big meal. Even after Mom added enough turkey to call it turkey soup, there was so much more leftover.

We’ll be eating it all week. I’m thankful for that. But I wish my brothers had left some mashed potatoes.

sourdoughislife:

New batch of spiced apple liqueur infusing! Recipe:
About 4-5 Gala* apples
5 whole cloves
1 cinnamon stick
Couple shakes of nutmeg
4 cups brandy
2 cups sugar syrup (recipe here)
Core and cut apples in quarters (leave peals on). Allow apples, cloves, cinnamon, nutmeg, and brandy to infuse in a jar for 2 weeks. Strain, filter, and add syrup. Age for 2-3 months. (Adapted from here.)
*I used Empires last time, but I only have Galas right now; we’ll see how this turns out!

South isn’t the biggest fan of brandy, but this is clearly worth a try. 

sourdoughislife:

New batch of spiced apple liqueur infusing! Recipe:

  • About 4-5 Gala* apples
  • 5 whole cloves
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • Couple shakes of nutmeg
  • 4 cups brandy
  • 2 cups sugar syrup (recipe here)

Core and cut apples in quarters (leave peals on). Allow apples, cloves, cinnamon, nutmeg, and brandy to infuse in a jar for 2 weeks. Strain, filter, and add syrup. Age for 2-3 months. (Adapted from here.)

*I used Empires last time, but I only have Galas right now; we’ll see how this turns out!

South isn’t the biggest fan of brandy, but this is clearly worth a try.