johndarnielle:

onceuponatown:

New York: The Bowery; entrance to 5 cent restaurant. C.1905.

I dream of opening a place like this

Ditto, John. 

Oh my god, The Review happened again! We wrote about steakhouses this month because Megan made an amazing steak at home. Probably one of the best things you can do for yourself is learn how to cook meat properly. Make it at home. It’s cheaper and better, and you don’t have to get all dressed up.

I wrote about fried chicken because I have a problem. We both accidentally wrote poems. I had fun looking through public domain images of cows.

This is The Review. Buy it at Gumroad. Pay what you want. We thank you. Then go grill a steak. It’s summer.


Japanese Strawberry Shortcake (by KitchenTigress)

Japanese Strawberry Shortcake (by KitchenTigress)

Japanese Strawberry Shortcake (by KitchenTigress)

Japanese Strawberry Shortcake (by KitchenTigress)

Japanese Strawberry Shortcake (by KitchenTigress)

Japanese Strawberry Shortcake (by KitchenTigress)

Honey Whiskey Lemonade

Honey Whiskey Lemonade

Honey Whiskey Lemonade

Honey Whiskey Lemonade

Honey Whiskey Lemonade

Honey Whiskey Lemonade

Honey Whiskey Lemonade

Honey Whiskey Lemonade
turnabout:

theweekmagazine:

The complete guide to cooking eggs every which way
You’ve had scrambled eggs. You’ve had poached eggs. But have you had poached-scrambled eggs?

Egg-cellent cookery.
turnabout:

theweekmagazine:

The complete guide to cooking eggs every which way
You’ve had scrambled eggs. You’ve had poached eggs. But have you had poached-scrambled eggs?

Egg-cellent cookery.
turnabout:

theweekmagazine:

The complete guide to cooking eggs every which way
You’ve had scrambled eggs. You’ve had poached eggs. But have you had poached-scrambled eggs?

Egg-cellent cookery.

turnabout:

theweekmagazine:

The complete guide to cooking eggs every which way

You’ve had scrambled eggs. You’ve had poached eggs. But have you had poached-scrambled eggs?

Egg-cellent cookery.

bookavore:

This is my Internet Chicken. I wanted to roast a chicken but was overwhelmed by the number of ways the Internet recommended to do so, so I asked Facebook, at which point I was overwhelmed by the number of ways Facebook thought I could roast a chicken. To cope, I roasted this chicken by combining several recommendations:

  • I started with Thomas Keller’s Simple Roast Chicken recipe because it got the most mentions, and because I can’t resist any recipe that includes instructions to “rain the salt” over something;
  • I followed Martha Stewart’s recommendation to pierce a lemon with a fork repeatedly and put it in the cavity;
  • I followed a friend’s idea to line the roasting pan with potato rounds, carrots, and a rough cut onion;
  • I took another friend’s advice to trust the thermometer rather than the timer;
  • I added a bunch of garlic cloves to everything because it seemed like a lot of people mentioned garlic.

It was, of course, fantastic, because apparently there is no wrong way to roast a chicken. The Internet! Is there anything it can’t do? Internet Chicken.

nbcnightlynews:

How do you celebrate Pi Day? With pie, of course!

(via npr)

lacuisine:

What’s the point of bay leaves?
Lots of stews, stocks, and soups call for bay leaves, but I don’t really taste them in the final dish. Would it make a difference if I left them out?

Here’s an easy way to see what bay leaves really taste like: throw a couple in a pot of water and let it simmer. Taste it after five minutes and you’ll probably get a good hit of menthol and eucalyptus (think: Vick’s VapoRub). That’s the chemical eugenol you’re smelling, and it’s the biggest constituent in the bay leaf’s flavor arsenal of more than 50 compounds.
Let them simmer for longer as they would in a stew—say, an hour or so—and you’ll notice that the flavor and aroma will change. The harsh nose-clearing menthol will taper down, while more complex tea-like aromas will start to come forward. Those are the flavors you’re looking to add to your soups, stews, and sauces.
It’s understandable why you may think they’re optional. Bay leaf, by its very nature, plays second fiddle to other, more prominent flavors. But just as a grind of black pepper, some sautéed anchovies, or a softened leek might not be instantly recognizable in a stew, they add a layer of subtle background music for the stars of your dish to play over.

lacuisine:

What’s the point of bay leaves?

Lots of stews, stocks, and soups call for bay leaves, but I don’t really taste them in the final dish. Would it make a difference if I left them out?

Here’s an easy way to see what bay leaves really taste like: throw a couple in a pot of water and let it simmer. Taste it after five minutes and you’ll probably get a good hit of menthol and eucalyptus (think: Vick’s VapoRub). That’s the chemical eugenol you’re smelling, and it’s the biggest constituent in the bay leaf’s flavor arsenal of more than 50 compounds.

Let them simmer for longer as they would in a stew—say, an hour or so—and you’ll notice that the flavor and aroma will change. The harsh nose-clearing menthol will taper down, while more complex tea-like aromas will start to come forward. Those are the flavors you’re looking to add to your soups, stews, and sauces.

It’s understandable why you may think they’re optional. Bay leaf, by its very nature, plays second fiddle to other, more prominent flavors. But just as a grind of black pepper, some sautéed anchovies, or a softened leek might not be instantly recognizable in a stew, they add a layer of subtle background music for the stars of your dish to play over.

thingsorganizedneatly:

John Dominis, 1968

ed: T.O.N. got a little mention on NPR’s The Picture Show.

tag your porn!

jaimealyse:

buzzfeedfood:

You may have noticed that there are about a million roast chicken recipes floating around the internet, all claiming the be THE BEST EVER. Obviously, only one can actually be the best. We decided to find out which one.

The trick is to make a hybrid recipe: Roast on a bed of veggies a la Jamie Oliver, stuff herbs (and butter, please) under the skin a la Judy Rodgers - the herbs and butter keep the meat perfect and delicious, and the bed of veggies stops the bottom from burning or smoking, and is your side dish. One-pan meal, perfect roast chicken.

Figuring out your personal preference in roasting chickens is one of the biggest culinary favors you can do for yourself.  jaimealyse:

buzzfeedfood:

You may have noticed that there are about a million roast chicken recipes floating around the internet, all claiming the be THE BEST EVER. Obviously, only one can actually be the best. We decided to find out which one.

The trick is to make a hybrid recipe: Roast on a bed of veggies a la Jamie Oliver, stuff herbs (and butter, please) under the skin a la Judy Rodgers - the herbs and butter keep the meat perfect and delicious, and the bed of veggies stops the bottom from burning or smoking, and is your side dish. One-pan meal, perfect roast chicken.

Figuring out your personal preference in roasting chickens is one of the biggest culinary favors you can do for yourself.  jaimealyse:

buzzfeedfood:

You may have noticed that there are about a million roast chicken recipes floating around the internet, all claiming the be THE BEST EVER. Obviously, only one can actually be the best. We decided to find out which one.

The trick is to make a hybrid recipe: Roast on a bed of veggies a la Jamie Oliver, stuff herbs (and butter, please) under the skin a la Judy Rodgers - the herbs and butter keep the meat perfect and delicious, and the bed of veggies stops the bottom from burning or smoking, and is your side dish. One-pan meal, perfect roast chicken.

Figuring out your personal preference in roasting chickens is one of the biggest culinary favors you can do for yourself. 

jaimealyse:

buzzfeedfood:

You may have noticed that there are about a million roast chicken recipes floating around the internet, all claiming the be THE BEST EVER. Obviously, only one can actually be the best. We decided to find out which one.

The trick is to make a hybrid recipe: Roast on a bed of veggies a la Jamie Oliver, stuff herbs (and butter, please) under the skin a la Judy Rodgers - the herbs and butter keep the meat perfect and delicious, and the bed of veggies stops the bottom from burning or smoking, and is your side dish. One-pan meal, perfect roast chicken.

Figuring out your personal preference in roasting chickens is one of the biggest culinary favors you can do for yourself. 

(via jaimealyse)

seanrrwilkins:

randwiches:


Food Porn: Giant Fucking Steak

Hngggghgghhhhh

Can get it.
seanrrwilkins:

randwiches:


Food Porn: Giant Fucking Steak

Hngggghgghhhhh

Can get it.

seanrrwilkins:

randwiches:

Food Porn: Giant Fucking Steak

Hngggghgghhhhh

Can get it.